Unrich

I was mentioned in Forbes last week.

Like, Forbes magazine.

Forbes.

A reporter from the "leading source for reliable business news and financial information" visited my place of employment a while back to get the scoop on our internal product testing practices and because my current role within the company deals with just that, said reporter tossed a few questions my way, the answer to one of which appeared in the article.

For more focused testing of new releases, Square organizes "testing parties," which pull in employees, some of whom are not working on the release, such as engineers, designers and product managers. The parties are held weekly or even multiple times per day just before a launch, with releases that are almost ready for the public but still running on test servers. Corey Lambert, Square's internal testing lead, started the testing parties when he joined in May 2011 and now they're a normal part of the release cycle. The internal testing catches bugs. For example, when Square changed how it calculated tips, the tips didn't show up correctly. Square's barista Kat Forck notified the testing team. "We can fix that in an hour instead of several hours. Because we're testing internally, we never get to the point of pushing things like that in the real world," Lambert says.

While reading my words in Forbes was neat, I can say with near certainty that this will be the last time I'll gain mention in a publication about money.

Apparently, 60 of my mom's Facebook pals agree.