LGBTour

We started with a stroll down Macondry Lane, the inspiration for Barbary Lane in my best friend Armistead Maupin’s Tales of the City novels.

Then we hauled ourselves to the Tenderloin to the site of the Compton’s Cafeteria riots, one of the first recorded LGBT-related riots in United States history and the beginning of transgender activism in San Francisco.

And finally, after a pit stop at the new beer hall on Market (for sustenance), we posted up in front of Gilbert Baker’s glorious rainbow flag for a photo.

Thank you, Judy, for indulging me my big queer tour of San Francisco.

All eight miles of it.

Summer Kitchen

Below is a beautiful poem by Donald Hall called Summer Kitchen which he wrote after the death of his wife Jane. It reminds me of my childhood, particularly my mother’s place in it. She, too, saw miracles in the ordinary.

In June’s high light she stood at the sink
With a glass of wine,
And listened for the bobolink,
And crushed garlic in late sunshine.

I watched her cooking, from my chair.
She pressed her lips
Together, reached for kitchenware,
And tasted sauce from her fingertips.

“It’s ready now. Come on,” she said.
“You light the candle.”
We ate, and talked, and went to bed,
And slept. It was a miracle.